Sunday, July 8, 2012

Burda

A few months ago I bought a one-year subscription to Burda sewing magazine.  Back in my earlier sewing frenzy of the late '90s, I subscribed for a couple years, and a lot of the things I made came from those magazines.  When we moved, I thought I probably wouldn't take up sewing again, so I got rid of all those magazines and the patterns I'd made from them.  Doh!  Lesson learned!

So one of my goals this year was to make something from one of the magazines.  I'll admit that it's a little hard to get myself to remove the pattern sheets, iron them, find the correct pattern pieces, trace them and then add the seam allowances, so I've been procrastinating about doing it.  But I had one yard of that medallion-print jersey left, and I really wanted to make a little top out of it.  So I chose this one, model 110B from the May 2012 issue:


Only mine doesn't look that good.


One of the things I really like about Burda magazine is the little line  drawings that accompany each pattern.  I find these are pretty accurate in describing the shape and details of the pattern.


See how boxy it is?  I totally got suckered by the styling on the model.  I'm pretty sure they pinned it closer to her body in the back.

I made a size 36 (European), which is the size that corresponds with my measurements.  For this draped-neck top in jersey, the instructions say to cut the pieces on the bias, but I didn't have enough fabric to do that, and my fabric had a lot of drape anyway, so it wasn't necessary.  After I finished it, I found it was very low-cut - much lower than I'm comfortable with.  So I re-seamed the shoulders at 5/8", thus taking 1.25 inches off in total.


I'm still debating whether I should take in the sides too.  I had a hard time getting what I consider to be a good picture of this.  I think when I'm wearing it, it drapes around my body in a nice way and doesn't look quite so boxy as it does when I stand still and pose for a picture.  And in my real life, I'm not often standing still!  I think I need to take some of the length off too.

Another thing I like about Burda magazine patterns is that there are often a couple variations which use the same pattern pieces.  This pattern was also shown in a woven fabric with the drape folded and tacked at the neckline.  Unfortunately the model wearing it is standing sideways, so you really can't see it!  But there's another, completely different variation which uses the exact same (two) pattern pieces:


Here's the little drawing for that one:


I think that's pretty cute!  You can see the pattern more closely, and even download it as a PDF if you like, right here.

Looking through the Burda magazines helps me understand garment construction and how different looks can be achieved using the same pieces.  So even if I don't make many projects from them, I think it's still money well-spent.

Do any of you sew from Burda magazines?

22 comments:

  1. I've never even heard of the Burda magazines, but now I really want to get my hands on one! I think that your version turned out very nice, although I believe you that it didn't photograph as well as it looks in real life (that happens to my knitting photos constantly). At the very least you learned something from the experience!

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    1. Nowadays, the learning seems more important to me, so I'm not usually too disappointed when things don't work out :-)

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  2. I don't sew from Burda magazines because I draft all of my patterns. I'm sorry I can't help you in that department.

    I think the top is great. The cowl/drape front frames your face very nicely. Well done in my book!

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    1. Yes, your skills are way beyond this! I think it's a great top for statement jewelry. Must make or buy some!

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  3. I've never used Burda magazines, although I like to see what other people make from them. We have a serious problem at our house with magazines piling up everywhere, and I know I would feel guilty throwing out Burdas! I didn't realize they reuse pattern pieces-- how interesting!

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    1. We do too - I've cancelled a lot of my subscriptions because of it. And Hubby gets 4 - 5 science magazines a WEEK!

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  4. I love using Burda patterns as many of the designs are very stylish and fashionable. It is a nuisance having to trace the patterns and add seam allowances but given they are so cheap I don't mind it too much.

    I like the cowl neck on your top but can see the sides are a bit shapeless. Does it look any better tucked in?

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    1. Good question! I haven't tucked it in yet! Must try! I also thought to try belting it.

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  5. The shape of that top reminds me of a similar one I copied from a RTW. Mine has a waistband though, and the fullness of the body is tamed with a few pleats at the shoulders and above the waistband. It's still loose and flowy, but less boxy. Seems like that's a good base pattern for lots of variations!

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    1. Hmmm . . . waistband might be a good idea. It's definitely too long, and I think that makes it look even more like it's too large for me.

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  6. Sneaky how different it looks on the model, I hate when they pull tricks like that!! But yours does look really cute!

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  7. I love Burda magazine, it's very popular in Bulgaria. Back in the days when I did a lot of sewing, I almost exclusively used Burda designs.
    I like the way your top drapes around you, I would leave it as it is. It does look roomy, but in a summery airy way.

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    1. It's really popular in Turkey too - I have a couple issues in Turkish. My mother-in-law sews almost everything from Burda.

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  8. I used Burda baby mags for my kids in the 90s but I have never really felt excited enough by an adult pattern to make one. I sold my old mags. I find German sewing patterns to be more square-cut than I like. Neue Mode mags were better but they don't seem to exist any more.

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    1. I agree they were a lot more square-cut back then. I think now there's a mix of styles ranging from square-cut to quite fitted. The sizing is slightly different from the American patterns, and I'm wondering if that would throw me off when making a more fitted pattern.

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  9. i really love this top! i just tried shirring for the first time (i am now an addict!!!) and it might be cute to shirr a couple rows at the waist to give it more shape without losing the nice drape. but shape or no shape, it's a great top!

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    1. That's a great idea! It never even occurred to me!

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  10. The May issue of the Burda is my first Burda buy. Not thought much of the subsequent issues but looking forward to the August edition. Yes you have to refer to the line drawings rather than the models to get a true representation. I will probably do a muslin first and try and curve the sides in. Only a beginner but will try lol.

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    1. Curving the sides on this one might be a good fix. I've been lucky - so far there's something in every Burda issue that I like!

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    2. Thinking of making the one with the embroidered batiste too one day. I did not even realise that was the same pattern lol.

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    3. Me too - I've been seeing similar things in the shops, and I really like them!

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