Thursday, July 11, 2013

Scoop Top, can't stop!

A few weeks ago, Lisa posted a super cute top she made using the Scoop Top (free downloadable) pattern.  It reminded me that I'd downloaded the pattern a while ago and even printed it out, so over the weekend I got busy making one. 

I had a cute fabric I'd purchased in a Girl Charlee sale last fall just because I liked it.  No idea what to do with it!  But when the Scoop Top pattern came out I thought they'd be a great match for each other because my fabric was also a tissue-weight burnout.

And after I finished that one, inspired by Lisa's print-mixing, I got into my box of leftovers to see if I could find two pieces to make a top like hers.  Sadly, everything I found was either too small or didn't coordinate with anything else.  But I did have a piece left over from that Sophie dress that was big enough for a whole top - so then I had two!


And I also found a large piece left from my very first Renfrew, so on Monday I used it to make up a third one, because I wanted to take pictures of how things work with the coverstitch machine  Some people had expressed an interest in how that works?

Anyhow, here's number three:


This is one of those free patterns that is only available in the size of the person who made it.  The pattern says "size S/M."  The whole time I was making the first one, it looked enormous and I was sure it would be too big, but when I put it on it was a little on the tight side!  Have I ever mentioned that I stink at spatial relationships?  For reference, I generally wear a size 4 top in RTW, so I would call this pattern a solid size Small.

The only change I made was to bring the neckline up by about a half inch.  I probably would have been fine leaving it as is though.  And because I changed it, I had to change the length of the binding piece.  I measured my new neckline (minus seam allowances) and then multiplied that number by 7/8 to get the length I needed.


Did you note the slight high/low hemline?  Hubby has dubbed this the "Butt Crack Avoider,"  LOL!  You can see why I love this man!  And he's not wrong!


Here I'm trying to show how the front and back come together at the side seam to give kind of a shirt-tail effect:


These tops were made with the serger and the coverstitch machine.  I used the coverstitch machine for all the hems and to sew down the neck binding, and the serger for the shoulder and side seams and to apply the neck binding.

The coverstitch machine does not have a free arm like the serger or the sewing machine.  I'm not great at sewing seams on small tubes to begin with, and the presser foot on the coverstitch machine is quite large.  In addition to that, you can't pivot a seam with a two-thread coverstitch the way you could on a sewing machine.  So I changed the construction to suit my needs.  Here's what I did:

1.  Sew shoulder seams with stay tape on the serger, then press open.
2.  Sew together short ends of neck binding on the serger, press open and then fold in half lengthwise with right sides out and press.
3.  Apply fusible web to sleeve, front and back hemlines:


4.  Remove backing paper, fold hem in and press:


5.  Coverstitch all four hems (sleeves, front and back):


6.   Sew the binding piece to the neck opening with the serger.
7.  Coverstitch the binding seam allowance down:


8.  Sew the side seams with the serger.
DONE!

The pattern comes with a pocket piece which I left off because all my fabrics were pretty busy.  But if you were adding the pocket, you would do that any time before sewing up the side seams.

This pattern is a winner for me - I'm sure I'll be making up more of them.  And it only takes a yard of fabric!  Have any of you guys made this one?  Are you tempted?

31 comments:

  1. It's very cute and reminds me of a favorite (RTW) top that I'm wearing today. I might have to download it! :)

    Congrats on 3 awesome new tops!

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    1. Thank you! I think you'll enjoy the pattern!

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  2. That's a great way to use up small yardage of knit fabrics. Originally I was going to use the Grainline scout woven but now I think I will try this pattern instead as it is made for knits. Thanks!

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    1. I STILL haven't done the Scout tee! I'm really hoping to make one this summer though! I think this one is probably a little faster, as it doesn't have separate sleeve pieces.

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  3. loving the coverstitch stitching... so beautiful! i really need to make more of this top, it's such a perfect tee. "butt crack avoider"... hahahaha! the man is a genius. totally stealing that!

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    1. Thank you! I'm getting better at it - I'm kind of surprised by how much practice it takes! I thought it would be the same as sewing or serging, but it's really not.

      I'm wearing the red and white one today, and am ready to go out into the world in confidence knowing that my butt crack is protected, LOL!

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  4. Oooh, that cover stitching looks gorgeous.

    I have the same difficulty as you in visualising whether things are going to be the right size. I think it's because when we see a pattern piece or flat garment easy to forget that when we wear the item it isn't flat, but curved around our bodies.

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    1. Exactly! I'm much more comfortable with 2D than 3D!!

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  5. I'm going to forward this post to a friend - I think this pattern is perfect for her! I love the red polka-dots.

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  6. These are so cute (and wow, so fast to make)! I love the prints-- they're all so fun!

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  7. I love them all. The cover stitch is great and fast projects are always a win!

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  8. I downloaded this pattern right after seeing Lisa's version but I haven't even printed it out yet (hmmm, should do that now). I love all three of your versions (you look very good in red)! My backside is the largest part of me so I can definitely use some butt crack avoidance. Your coverstitch gives such a nice finished look. (I wore my McCall's 6744 to work today and it was like wearing my PJs).

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    1. Funny - Hubby also loves me in red! I like red, but it's not usually my first choice. Guess I should choose it more!

      I think you're going to love this pattern. I've already worn my red one and the darker floral one - two days in a row! Cute and super easy to wear - this one also feels like pajamas!

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    2. I'm so glad you posted this since now I have a new top (and I love it)!! I didn't realize it was only 9 pages to print out (I need a downloads list of shame for all the files that are on my computer or printed out but not taped together yet). Next time I might raise the neckline a bit like you did.

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  9. You're on fire! I turn away for a couple of days and you finish 2 projects.

    Go girl!

    ;-)

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    1. Hehehe - it really was mostly to play with my new machine, but I can certainly use more tops - I always seem to make dresses but don't wear them that often!

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  10. Love your versions of the scoop top- I LOVE THIS PATTERN. Out of my huge stash of paid for patterns this freeby has been the one I have made the most times; I'm up to five plus one dress (extended the middle by about 15 inches or so?) My construction method is slightly different- I sew / serge one shoulder, apply neck binding, second shoulder, hem or bind sleeves, side seams, hem. I've got it down to an hour or less including cutting. My favorite part is that crack hider! Looks great with a belt too, cinched in it gives a bit of a peplum look.

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    1. Isn't it funny? I do the same: it seems the patterns that get the most use are either the free ones or the super-expensive Indie ones (I guess that's a good thing!). I have a feeling I'll be catching up with you on this pattern! I love your idea of extending it into a dress . . .

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  11. And now I'm off to download this pattern. Thanks for being an enabler! Your tops are fantastic!

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    1. Hehehe - at least it won't cost you anything this time!

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  12. What a great top, your coverstitching is beautiful. It's very useful to know about the sizing, I'm with you, it's tricky to visualise how big something will be from the flat pattern pieces :)

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  13. Oh what an awesome wardrobe builder! Those kinds of tops are so great, I can't seem to get enough of them. I've been in a "Scout" place lately and am about to whip out some in knits. Loved seeing the coverstitch in action!

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    1. I'm hoping to do a Scout very soon with a friend! I'm going woven for my first one :-)

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  14. So cute! Love the dotty one the best, it's so summery!

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