Sunday, November 3, 2013

Starmore Progress

I didn't work on my Starmore sweater much over the summer - it's now a huge mass of wool fabric and it gets a little hot having it pooled up on my lap!  But once the temperatures cooled down a little I picked it back up, and on Oct. 1 I finished the body.  A few days later, I cut open the first sleeve steek and got started on the sleeve. 

I've managed to be fairly consistent for the last month.  I try to do 4 rows a day; some days I don't have time to pick it up, other days I work 8 rows.  Starting immediately from the top of the sleeve, there are 2 stitches decreased every 4th row, so it gets quicker as I go along. I'd say I'm about half way done with the first sleeve now.

This morning it was nice and sunny, so I took some update pictures.

Body + sleeve from the back

Sleeve; the entire body has been steamed, but the sleeve has not.

Uncut steek on the other side

Cut steek from the inside

Close-up of cut steek:  because Shetland yarn is "sticky" it doesn't unravel.

Body fabric from the wrong side - still very pretty!

Close-up of floats.  I (almost) never float across more than 3 stitches.

Front neck steek

Body + sleeve from the front

Now that this piece is looking more sweater-like, I'm getting excited to finish and wear it.  I really want to have it done for this winter, so I'm trying to keep up my momentum.

I'm thinking about doing a video on 2-color stranded knitting.  Anybody interested in seeing that?  I'll warn you that my method is to hold one color in each hand, so it works best for those who are comfortable with both English and Continental knitting.

34 comments:

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    1. Thank you, Evie! I'm very pleased with it myself!

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  2. THis is beautiful. I've never used steeks and I have to say I'm afraid. I know the tech works, or no one would do it, but it still freaks me out!

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    1. It is pretty hard to do it the first time! But I'm so over it by now that I didn't even sew a line of reinforcement stitches on this one - the Shetland yarn is so sticky it doesn't need it. I realized afterward I should have taken a video while I cut it, to show there's nothing to be afraid of. I'll try to do it on the next one!

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  3. This is gorgeous! I can't wait to see the final results!

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  4. I am loving the sweater and the guts(!) to steek !!!

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  5. Wow, your sweater looks already amazing! And I would be interested in your tutorial :) Not that I am ready yet to knit with two colors, but later. I know it doesn't belong here, but I just finished my Miette cardigan (http://ela-sews.blogspot.co.uk/2013/11/knitted-miette-cardigan-done.html) with the help of your great knit along. The Miette is my first cardigan and I just wanted to say thank you for your lovely KAL!

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    1. That's awesome, Daniela! I visited your page and left you a comment there - fantastic work!

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  6. Yes to the video -- that's how I strand, too. And what a gorgeous sweater. Brava!

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  7. This is stunning Gail! I'm not personally too fond of Alice Starmore's patterns but I'm amazed at the amount if work and the technique that goes into it! I hope you'll be able to wear it this winter it should be very warm with the double layer of yarn!

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    1. Thanks Sophie! It is a lot of work to knit one of these, however: it's not difficult work! Alice Starmore is such a genius that her patterns just make sense. All I have to do is follow along!

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  8. Wow!! This is gorgeous! Good luck with the rest of it.

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  9. That is gorgeous - I had never even heard of a steek but it all looks terribly impressive :)

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  10. wow! this is far more impressive than i can even appreciate. so beautiful!

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  11. Gail, it's stunning! OMG I love it. I have been wanting to learn to steek , but just haven't worked up enough nerve yet.

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  12. Your knitting project are gorgeous and make my brain hurt (in a good way) trying to figure out how it works. I wouldn't mind a peek at your technique.

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  13. Gah! This is stunning! Knit faster!

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  14. Gail, this looks so deliciously good! I bet you can't wait to wear it. I would love to see a video of stranded knitting. I've only ever done one colourwork project and it was a pretty simple hat so I'll take all the help I can get ;)

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  15. Oh my goodness, this is incredible!!

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  16. This is crazy cool! I don't understand Fair Isle knitting at all, but this is totally impressive!

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  17. This is awesome! I've not tried anything so complicated with fair isle yet but may dive in some time soon! And steeking! I've been looking for a class on this in Toronto as I think it may be a technique that I need some hand holding for... if for no other reason than to get a little reassurance before I make that first cut! And a colourwork tutorial would be a great idea! I had a hard time finding one that worked for me when I decided to give fair isle a try. Besides, there are so many different ways to do stranded knitting that seeing different approaches can be useful. And should you ever decide to do a steeking tutorial, I'd be all over that!!! Sara

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    1. The hardest part of knitting this sweater is paying attention - no mean feat for me, LOL! I totally agree - it's always good if you can see lots of different ways to do things, and then figure out which works best for you. Working on some videos today!

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  18. This is a masterpiece! It's so beautiful! I am terrified to steek. I'm going to overcome my fear this winter.... maybe. :-D

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    1. Thanks, Michelle! It's not that scary, really! I'll come hold your hand if you want me to :-)

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  19. This is gorgeous! I'm looking forward to seeing more. It's certainly the season for it. I admit, I'm a float rebel and don't catch the floats unless they're over 10 stitches or so. lol

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    1. Oh you bad girl! I'm calling the float police right now, LOL!

      I'm far too clumsy to have floats that long in my work - I would for sure get all my fingers stuck in them when I put on the garment. You must be more graceful!

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  20. Wow! This is some color work! You are fearless with the steeking.

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  21. I love this one, but steeking terrifies me. Reading the other comments, I see I'm not alone and I'm glad! :)

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  22. I can't tell you how awed and jealous I am at how stunningly beautiful and even your colourwork is. And look at those floats!! I would wear it inside out as well they are so gorgeous.

    Sigh.

    One day.

    I've just failed at writing a fair isle xmas ball pattern and am now doubting starting my big, colourwork xmas sweater. Gulp.

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    1. Well, writing a pattern is a whole lot different from following someone else's directions! I think you should go ahead with your Boreal - you can always rip it out if you don't like it!

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  23. This is beautiful Gail. I'm a fan of Starmore patterns, but have never made one myself. I just think their use of color and intricate design are genius.

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    1. I've said it before and I'll say it again: Alice Starmore is a genius. Especially in terms of color. Her sweater patterns do seem a little daunting, but they are so logical that really I think the only issue is committing to having one sweater on the needles for such a long time, as these are definitely not quick knits!

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  24. This sweater is turning into an amazing piece of art! I admire your perseverance to knit such a difficult sweater and bravery to steek it.

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